3D printing a configurable lab-on-a-chip: Page 2 of 2

April 26, 2019 //By Nick Flaherty
A 3D printed configurable lab-on-a-chip
Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US have 3D-printed an all-liquid device that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a range of applications such as battery materials or drug screening.
the channel and automatically removes unwanted byproducts while it continues to print a sequence of bridges to specific catalysts, and carry out the steps of chemical synthesis.

"The form and functions of these devices are only limited by the imagination of the researcher," said Helms. "Autonomous synthesis is an emerging area of interest in the chemistry and materials communities, and our technique for 3D-printing devices for all-liquid flow chemistry could help to play an important role in establishing the field."

The researchers next plan to electrify the walls of the device using conductive nanoparticles to expand the types of reactions that can be explored. "With our technique, we think it should also be possible to create all-liquid circuitry, fuel cells, and even batteries," said Helms. "It's been really exciting for our team to combine fluidics and flow chemistry in a way that is both user-friendly and user-programmable."

There is more about the lab at  foundry.lbl.gov/

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